Certification Insights: Forgotten Password

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In can be tempting to create a new account if you can’t remember your previous information, or if you’ve changed email addresses due to a job change. But, that leads to multiple accounts which causes its own set of problems down the line.

Instead, here are some simple ways to find your old account information.

First, click the “login help” link from the VMware Education or Certification log in screen.

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From that page you can request to have your password or user name sent to you. If you don’t remember either one, start by requesting your user name, then use that information to request the password.

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If you no longer have access to your old email account, then please email our support team for further assistance.

 

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Online VCDX Workshop Pilot

VCDX merchI am excited to announce that we are going to pilot doing a full length VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX) Workshop online in roughly two weeks on April 7. Previously all of our VCDX Workshops have occurred at large VMUG UserCons along with both VMworlds. Sadly this model hasn’t allowed us to reach a larger audience due to people being unable to physically get there. A couple years back we did a couple half-length VCDX Workshops online that were listen only. While these were well attended, it lacked the interaction that made the in person workshops so successful.

In thinking about how to reach more people, I had the idea to pilot a new model of full length workshops online with smaller groups. In order to get the interaction that makes them so useful to the attendees, we will limit the number of registrants to 45.  This is so that true Q&A can happen without it becoming chaotic. On April 7 at 10AM EDT I am going to run the first one of these workshops for up to 45 people. If it is successful, I will be doing many more of these in the coming months.

If you are thinking about registering, for this first run I ask that you fit one of the following categories:

  • Have at least one VMware Certification and want to learn about the VCDX
  • Have decided you want to do the VCDX and would like to learn more
  • Are already down the path to submit your VCDX or have already submitted and want to try again
  • Can focus on the entire 4 hour session, won’t be multi-tasking, and come ready with questions
  • Fill out a short web survey at the end of the session

The reason I ask for the above is to make sure we get a good idea of the success of this pilot, I don’t want people half paying attention or the content does not apply to.

If you are interested, get registered here!  Remember, first come first serve for 45 people!

Details on the WebEx will be sent to all attendees after registration fills up.

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What is Network Virtualization?

In Redefining Networking with Network Virtualization network virtualization is defined as:

Much as server virtualization recreates the traits of a physical server within software, network virtualization likewise replicates the components of network and security services in a software container. Consequently, the virtualized network is provisioned and managed independent of your hardware, and the physical networking devices simply become a vehicle for forwarding packets. With network virtualization, your network administrators can create and provision virtual networks—logical switches, routers, firewalls, load balancers, VPN, and workload security—in minutes rather than days or even weeks.

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What does this mean for IT organizations? Enterprises can use network virtualization to connect to the hybrid cloud without worrying about network hardware dependency, interoperability, or service provider lock-in. The resulting hybrid cloud provides much greater business agility, dramatically simpler operations, and lower cost.

Download your copy today to learn more, including

  • The Four Cs of Legacy Networking: Complexity, Configuration, Costs, & Cyber Attacks
  • Three Trends Reshaping the Networking Industry

Ready for even more on this topic? Check out our free elearning course, VMware Network Virtualization Fundamentals to learn the benefits of and use cases for VMware NSX network virtualization, as well as its main components, features, and services.

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One Vault to Secure Them All: HashiCorp Releases Vault Enterprise 0.7

There are a few key reasons that you need to look at Vault by HashiCorp. If you’re in the business of IT on the Operations or the Development side of the aisle, you should already be looking at the entire HashiCorp ecosystem of tools. Vault is probably one that has my eye the most lately other than Terraform. Here is why I think it’s important:

  • Secret management is difficult
  • People are not good at secret management
  • Did I mention that secret management was difficult?

There are deeper technical reasons around handling secrets with automated deployments and introducing full multi-environment CI/CD, but the reality for many of the folks who read my blog and who I speak to in the community is that we are really early in our traditional application management to next-generation application management evolution. What I mean is that we are doing some things to enable better flow of applications and better management of infrastructure with some lingering bad practices.

Let’s get to the good stuff about HashiCorp Vault that we are talking about today.

Announcing HashiCorp Vault Enterprise version 0.7!

This is a very big deal as far as release go for a few reasons:

  • Secure multi-datacenter replication
  • Expanded granularity with Access Control policies
  • Enhanced UI to manage existing and new Vault capabilities

Many of the development and operations teams are struggling to find the right platform for secret management. Each public cloud provider has their own self-contained secret management tool. Many of the other platform providers such as Docker Datacenter also have their own version. The challenge with a solution that is vendor or platform specific is that you’re locked into the ecosystem.

Vault Enterprise as your All Around Secret Management

The reason that I’ve been digging into lots of the HashiCorp tools over the last few years is that they provide a really important abstraction from the underlying vendor platforms which are integrated through the open source providers. As I’ve moved up the stack from Vagrant for local builds and deployment to Terraform for IaaS and cloud provider builds, the secret management has leapt to the fore as an important next step.

Vault has both the traditional open source version and also the Vault Enterprise offering. Enterprise gives you support, and a few nifty additions that the regular Vault product don’t have. This update includes the very easy-to-use UI:

Under the replication area in the UI we can see where our replicas are enabled and the status of each of them. The replication can ben configured right in the UI by administrators which eases the process quite a bit:

Replication across environments ensures that you have the resiliency of a distributed environment, and that you can keep the secret backends close to where they are being consumed by your applications and infrastructure.  This is a big win over standalone version which required opening up VPNs, or serving over HTTPS which was the way many have been doing it in the past.  Or, worse, they were running multiple vaults in order to host one on each cloud or on-prem environment.

We have response wrapping very easily accessible in the UI:

As mentioned above, we also have the more granular policy management in Vault Enterprise 0.7 as you can see here:

If you want to get some more info on what HashiCorp is all about, I highly suggest that you have a listen to the recent podcasts I published over at the GC On-Demand site including the first with founder Mitchell Hashimoto, and the second with co-foudner Armon Dadgar. Both episodes will open up a lot of detail on what’s happening at HashiCorp, in the industry in general, and hopefully get you excited to kick the tires on some of these cool tools!

Congratulations to the HashiCorp team and community on the release of Vault Enterprise 0.7 today!  You can read up on the full press release of the Vault Enterprise update here at the HashiCorp website.

What to expect from VeeamON 2017

I’ve had the opportunity to attend both the previous VeeamON conferences in Vegas as well as the mini VeeamON forum last year in the UK and since it’s still a relatively new conference on the scene I thought I’d give everyone a bit of an overview and heads up as what to expect from the

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Hear how VMware Certification has Benefited these IT Professionals

Last month we added four new videos to the Certification Stories series on our YouTube channel. Begun in 2013, the VMware Certification Story series brings you informal interviews with current certification holders about the impact VMware certification has had on their career and their advice for others on the path to certification.

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VCDX Defense Tips: An Interview with Brett Guarino

The VMware Certified Design Expert (VCDX) is the holy grail of VMware certification. Those who opt to pursue the VCDX have already achieved at least one VMware Certified Professional (VCP) and two VMware Certified Advanced Professional (VCAP) certifications. They are truly VMware experts.

We had a chance to speak with Brett Guarino, a Senior VMware Certified Instructor (VCI) who recently gave a presentation at VMworld Europe on preparing for the VCDX Defense. Brett has been teaching various courses with VMware over the past seven years. Recently, he’s been preparing for his second attempt at the VCDX Defense. In this interview, he shares ideas, tips, and insights for those working toward this prestigious certification.

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Before getting into the VCDX process, tell me a little bit about why you love instructing?

The most rewarding part of it is working with students who come into the classroom and have needs. One of the first things I ask my students is “What are you here for?” I don’t think anyone’s come into my class without hearing that question. By the end of the course, students leave with something tangible that helps them do their jobs better, saves them time, makes them more of an expert. For me, knowing that I’ve given my customer (in this case the student) something to take away with them that’s going to empower their career is very rewarding.

 

Tell me a little bit about the VCDX. What’s it designed to prepare people for? 

It’s more about validating your existing skillset. The VCDX doesn’t teach you how to become an architect. However, strengthening your skill as an architect is definitely one of the side benefits of going through the process of VCDX preparation. Assuming that you go through the preparation and successfully achieve the VCDX, you’re going to learn and hone skills and tools that will ultimately make you a better designer and architect.

 

VCDX preparation requires quite a bit of time from what I’ve heard. What do you recommend in terms of time management?

You cannot prepare for the amount of time it takes. You just can’t. I’ve had discussions with several people who are VCDXs and they all say the same thing. You really can’t prepare for it. From design to documentation, to preparing for the defense presentation, you just need to plan to make this what your life is about for a while.

That being said, when you go into this type of commitment, you’ve got to let the people who are important in your life know that this is what you are going to be doing. You need to prepare your friends, family, colleagues, whoever, that for the next several months, your spare time is going to be dedicated to the VCDX. Many people are under the impression that once you’ve finished your design, you’re basically done. But actually, at that point, you have to create a presentation for the initial half of the defense, and that’s not a trivial task. That presentation is something that you’ve got to know inside and out.

It’s a simple suggestion, but I recommend getting out a calendar and setting deadlines. Know when you will have certain parts of your design finished, know when you will send them off to peers for review, build in time so that when you get behind, you have enough room to double down if you need to. For an extended project like the VCDX, this type of planning goes a long way.

 

In your presentation, one of things you spoke about was the SMART methodology. Can you elaborate on this?

SMART is a goal achievement ideology and stands for Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic, and Timely. When preparing for VCDX, you’ve got to have milestones. Breaking things up, knowing what will be done when, knowing which days you will be working on which things — these are all very important elements of the process. The idea is that you are going to work smart as you prepare. Taking the time to apply the SMART methodology to each of your goals will help you both stay sane and get what you need to have done when you need to have it done.

 

One of the things you hear about from other VCDXs is the importance of assembling a group or community of people to help you as you prepare. What are your thoughts on finding a group as you pursue the VCDX?

First, you want to make use of all your resources. Find out who you know that’s an expert in specific technologies. Find out who can give you their time. Find out who is really willing to help you. There may come a time as you go through your process when you’ve gathered too many people, and not everyone is actually helping you get to where you want to be. At that point, you may need to drop people. The idea is that you want to make sure the people you surround yourself with are people who are going to challenge you, tell you the truth when something’s not working, and ask you questions that you haven’t thought of yourself.

There’s also the current VCDX community. In seeking assistance from VCDX mentors, who may be identified at https://vcdx.vmware.com/ (use the Mentor Option under Optional Flags), be respectful of their time. They have full-time jobs beyond their desire to volunteer to assist VCDX candidates. Reach out to them after having achieved the VCIX certification (i.e., have both your VCAPs already).

VCDX mentors may aid you with design preparation, mock panels, etc. They should not be expected to draft your design for you. Use the volunteer VCDX mentor resources sparingly. Initially to help define design considerations (requirements, constraints, risks, and assumptions), then to review initial drafts, and finally for panel mocks.

 

How do you recommend people prepare for the defense itself? What soft skills are important? 

Public speaking. It’s one of the key things that people have trouble with, especially if they don’t deal with public speaking in their jobs on a day-in-day-out basis. When you’re standing in front of the panel, you’re going to be challenged, and you need to be prepared for that.

There are a few elements of public speaking that you really should master, things like making eye contact, never speaking with your back to the audience, and whiteboarding. Whiteboarding is a key soft skill, and few people pay attention to developing it. Learning how to stand at the front of the room, write out complex concepts on a whiteboard, and then explain it in a clear way to an audience does a lot for keeping your viewers engaged and translating your mastery and comfort level with a given subject.

Although you won’t necessarily be judged on your public speaking ability per se, having these skills in your pocket helps you establish confidence and comfort so that you can be positioned to really demonstrate your expertise and mastery to the panel.

The other thing that I would say is that part of learning how to speak publicly means learning how to guide a discussion and direct a narrative authoritatively. As the presenter, you’re going to be driving the conversation. Making sure you’re driving the conversation in the direction you want it to go will help you gain points as you present.

 

The last question is kind of a fun question, but what’s the best way to celebrate once you’ve completed your defense?

Well, my first answer is that I’ll let you know when I pass!

But seriously, rewarding the people in your life who’ve helped to get you to where you are is huge. Make sure you acknowledge your mentors, reviewers, mock panelists. And then also do something for the people who’ve made sacrifices and supported you emotionally — your spouse, your kids, your significant other. I’d say that’s a good way to celebrate as you come back to normal life.

 

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Customizing the Turbonomic HTML5 Login Screen Background

DISCLAIMER:  This is currently unsupported as any changes made to your Turbonomic login page may be removed with subsequent Turbonomic application updates.  This is meant to be a little bit of fun and can be easily repeated and reversed in the case of any updates or issues. Sometimes you want to spice up your web view for your application platforms.

This inspiration came from William Lam  as a little fun add on when you have a chance to update your login screen imagery. With the new HTML5 UI in Turbonomic it is as easy as one simple line of code to add a nice background to your login screen. Here is the before:

Since I’m a bit of a space fanatic, I want to use a little star-inspired look:

To add your own custom flavor, you simply need to remotely attach to your TAP instance over SSH, browse to the

/srv/www/htdocs/com.vmturbo.UX/app directory, and then modify the BODY tag in the index.html file.

Scroll down to the very bottom of the file because it’s the last few lines you need to access. Here is the before view:

Here is the updated code to use in your BODY tag:

body style="background-image: url(BACKGROUNDIMAGEFILENAME);background-size: contain;background-repeat: no-repeat;background-color: #000000"‍‍‍‍‍‍‍

This is the code that I’ve used for a web-hosted image:

body style="background-image: url(https://static.pexels.com/photos/107958/pexels-photo-107958.jpeg);background-size:?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss contain;background-repeat: no-repeat;background-color: #000000"‍‍‍‍‍‍‍‍

Note the background-color tag as well.  That is for the overflow on the screen when your image doesn’t fill the full screen height and width.  I’ve set the background to be black for the image I’ve chosen. You can also upload your own custom image to your Turbonomic instance into the same folder, but as warned above, you may find that this update has to happen manually as you do future application updates to the Turbonomic environment.

For custom local images, the code would be using a local directory reference.  For ease of use, upload the image file right to the same folder and you can simply use the filename in the CSS code. The real fun is when you get to share your result.

I’d love to see your own version of the custom login screen. Drop in a commend below with your example and show how you liven up your Turbonomic instance with a little personalized view.