Turbonomic Technical Poster Goodness

As a long-time fan of the technical posters that came out of the vCommunity and PowerShell community, I was very happy to have a chance to work with Rene Van Den Bedem (aka @VCDX133) on something fun at Turbonomic.  Rene and I teamed up to craft the first official Turbonomic Technical poster for Turbonomic version 5.9 that you can download in PDF format right from the Green Circle Community

Big thanks to Rene for all that he has done to help my team with this, and of course for all of his continued support of many community efforts across all of our shared IT communities.

Click the handy dandy link here to go to the site and get your own Turbonomic Technical poster!

Virtual Network Provisioning via the Hypervisor

We’ve shared other resources with you before that discuss what network virtualization is and the essential of micro-segmentation. Today, we’re taking a look at provisioning virtual networks.

According to our free whitepaper Network Virtualization Makes Your Life Easier:

Virtual networks can be provisioned using a cloud management platform (CMP) that requests virtual network and security services for corresponding workloads. The controller then distributes the necessary services to the corresponding virtual switches and logically attaches them to the appropriate workloads.

This allows different virtual networks to be associated with different workloads on the same hypervisor. It also makes it possible to create anything and everything you might need—from basic virtual networks with as few as two nodes to advanced constructs used to deliver multi-tier applications.

The integration of all networking functions into the hypervisor is a big advantage of network virtualization. It allows the network, and all associated functions, to follow virtual machines as they move from one server to another. And since the network connections are all in software, there’s no need to reconfigure them. Your network becomes far more flexible, and can go anywhere in your data center that is virtualized.

nv_provisioning

Download your copy today to learn how network virtualization:

  • Meets the demands of a dynamic business
  • Increases flexibility with hardware abstraction
  • Increases security with micro-segmentation
  • Establishes a platform for the SDDC

Ready for even more on this topic? Check out our free elearning course, VMware Network Virtualization Fundamentals to learn the benefits of and use cases for VMware NSX network virtualization, as well as its main components, features, and services.

The post Virtual Network Provisioning via the Hypervisor appeared first on VMware Education & Certification.

Certification Insights: Updating your Email and Account Information

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Changing jobs is an exciting time, with lots of people to notify and documents to update. If you use your employer email address for your VMware Education & Certification (myLearn) account, you’ll want to make sure you change your account information before your last day. Here’s how:

  1. After you log into your VMware Certification account, click on the myProfile link in the sidebar

updateacct1

 

2. When your profile opens, make any changes needed to your address or phone number, then select the change email option

updateacct2

3. Enter your new email twice, then click on the authentication link when you receive it.

updateacct3

 

The post Certification Insights: Updating your Email and Account Information appeared first on VMware Education & Certification.

How to Reset Single Sign On Password in vSphere 6.x

Periodically we’ll be bringing you tech tips from our Technical Training team on topics they receive questions on from the field. Today’s post comes from Rohit Sachdeva a Technical Training Specialist. Rohit is very passionate about delivering VMware technical training. At VMware, he is responsible for the enablement of the newly hired Technical Support Engineers and he also delivers advanced vSphere training to the more experienced Global Support staff.


Since the vSphere 6.0 release, Single Sign-On (SSO) is a component of the Platform Service Controller (PSC). SSO is the main component of PSC and responsible to provide token to the users to access the solutions connected to vCenter.

It is a human tendency, we often forget the passwords and even keeping a track of the passwords is a hectic job. This is the reason we have SSO as a component for almost all the software which will act as an authentication broker and you do not have to remember password for every solution connected to the vCenter.

One password is enough to access multiple solutions (provided you have permission to access the solution).

Now the billion-dollar question is what will happen if you forgot the SSO administrator password? The simple answer is, it is not possible to manage SSO without SSO administrator. You wouldn’t even be able to promote another user as an SSO Administrator.

So, is there any way to reset the SSO password? Yes, it is possible and here are the steps to reset SSO password for VCSA 6.5.

  1. Log in to vCenter Server Appliance using SSH as the root user.
    ss1
  2. Run this command to enable access the bash shell.
    set --enabled true
  3. Type the shell and press Enter
    ss2
  4. Run
    /usr/lib/vmware-vmdir/bin/vdcadmintool

    This will show the below mentioned console.

    ss3

  5. Press 3 to enter the Reset Account Password option.
    a) It will prompt for an “Account UPN”
    b) Enter administrator@vsphere.local
    c) A new temporary password is generatedss4
  6. You can use this temporary password to login to vCenter server and change the SSO password after login to vCenter server.
    ss5
  7. After login, Click on Administration>Single Sign On > Users
    a) Right click on Administrator and select Modify
    b) Change the passwordss6

We have successfully reset the vCenter SSO password.

The post How to Reset Single Sign On Password in vSphere 6.x appeared first on VMware Education & Certification.

New Certification & Exams: VCP6.5-DCV

VMW-LGO-CERT-PRO-6.5-DATA-CTR-VIRTIntroducing a new certification: VMware Certified Professional 6.5 – Data Center Virtualization (VCP6.5-DCV)

VMware vSphere 6.5 enables companies to accelerate their digital transformation to cloud computing and introduces a number of new features and capabilities that increases business agility. With that much change, this new certification provides you an opportunity to prove your expertise in the latest version of the industry-leading virtualization platform.

For those who already have your VCP, this new VCP provides a new path and recertification opportunity.

There are three exams associated with this new certification:

  1. vSphere 6.5 Foundations (exam # 2V0-602)
          Ed. note: registration for this exam opens on 4/24/17
  2. VCP6.5-DCV elective exam (exam # 2V0-622)
  3. VCP6.5-DCV delta exam (exam # 2V0-622D)

More details on the certification requirements, and the specific exam objectives can be found at the links above.

The post New Certification & Exams: VCP6.5-DCV appeared first on VMware Education & Certification.

Adding SSH Access for DigitalOcean when Using Terraform

We’ve been looking at how to add a little Terraform into your IT infrastructure provisioning toolkit lately. Using DigitalOcean is also super easy and inexpensive for testing out processes and doing things like repetitive builds using Terraform.

The first post where we saw how to do a simple Terraform environment build on DigitalOcean appeared at my ON:Technology blog hosted at Turbonomic. That gave us the initial steps for a quick droplet deployment.

We also talked about how to access your DigitalOcean droplets via the command line using SSH keys here which is very important. The reason that it is important is that without SSH keys, you are relying on using the root account with a password. DigitalOcean will create a complex password for you when deploying your droplet. This is not something you can find out without actually resetting the root password and restarting your droplet. This is both insecure (reverting to password access instead of SSH key pair) and also disruptive because you are rebooting the instance to do the password reset.

Now it’s time to merge these two things together!

Adding SSH key details to the Terraform DigitalOcean provider

We are going to add a few things to what we have already done in those two other posts. You will need the following:

Getting your SSH fingerprint is a simple process. Start by going to the top right of your DigialOcean console to the icon which has a dropdown for your account settings:

In the profile page, choose the Settings option from the menu on the left-hand panel:

The SSH fingerprint that you’ll need is in the security settings page. Keep this somewhere as safe as you would your SSH keys themselves because this is an important piece of security information.

Using the SSH Details in Environment Variables

Our settings are going to be stored using local environment variables just like with our DigitalOcean key was in the first example blog. Because we have a few other things to keep track of now we will see the changes in the provider.tf file:

Our environments variables are going to have the same format which is TF_VAR_digitalocean_ssh_fingerprint which is your fingerprint you got from the security settings. The other two things we need are the TF_VAR_digitalocean_pub_key and TF_VAR_digitalocean_private_key parameters which are the paths to your local SSH key files.

NOTE: The use of the file locations is actually not needed for basic key configuration using Terraform. I just thought we should set that up which will come to use later on in other blogs around using Terraform with DigitalOcean.

Use the export command to sett up your variables.  Our Terraform file contains an extra config parameter now which you’ll see here:

These new parameters will read in all that we need to launch a new droplet, attach the appropriate SSH key by the fingerprint in DigitalOcean, and then to allow us to manage the infrastructure with Terraform.

Time for our routine, which should always be: terraform validate to confirm our syntax is good followed by a terraform plan to test the environment:

Now we run our terraform apply to launch the droplet:

Now we have launched a droplet on DigitalOcean with Terraform. Use the SSH command line to connect to the droplet as the root account. Make sure you’ve done all the steps in the previous blog to set up your ssh-agent and then you should be all set:

This is the next step in making more secure, repeatable, and compassable infrastructure using Terraform on DigitalOcean. These same methods will also be showing up as we walk through future more complex examples on DigitalOcean and other providers.

Let’s clean up after ourselves to make sure that we take advantage of the disposable and elastic nature of our public cloud infrastructure by very easily running the terraform destroy command to remove the droplet:

Hopefully this is helpful!